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United States

Running the Good Race

Rachel Chimits
June 6, 2019

Pastors around the world need encouragement, refreshment and prayer from their fellow believers.

Recently, Gary Wilkerson, Kelly Wilkerson, Nicky Cruz and Carter Conlon were invited along with other pastors and leaders to speak at a pastors’ conference in Kenya. 

The vice president of Kenya’s wife, Rachel Ruto, is passionate about encouraging the church in her country. She organized and laid the way for everyone who came to speak as well as for many of the attendees to be aware of the event and able to attend.

The purpose of this conference was to encourage Kenya’s spiritual leaders, whether they were from a Nairobi megachurch or a tiny village’s house church. 

Stranger in a Strange Land

Rachel Chimits
June 13, 2019

Part of World Challenge’s domestic mission work is reaching refugees making their home in the United States.

The Refugee Project released a shocking statistic: “Nearly 69 million people have been displaced from their home due to war, persecution or violence. That’s one of every 111 people on the planet.”

In 2017, the United States had over 280,000 refugees enter, the majority of them from Asian countries where governments are cracking down on Christian churches. 

A Barrier of Tests

Many U.S. citizens might be shocked to learn how difficult it is for a refugee to enter the country.

Acting Out the “E” Word

Rachel Chimits
June 7, 2019

Evangelism is becoming an increasingly touchy subject both outside and inside the church.

A Discipleship Pathway Assessment study found that “most Protestant churchgoers say they are eager to talk to others about Jesus, and are praying for opportunities to share their faith. But most say they have not had any evangelistic conversations in the past six months.”

Is modern Western culture making evangelism more difficult than it was before? This seems unlikely. Every generation has faced obstacles to sharing the gospel.

So why do Christians feel like they can’t or shouldn’t evangelize? 

Including Believers With Disabilities

Rachel Chimits
July 2, 2019

Ministries are now taking steps to help church members with disabilities feel included and part of community.

Ellen Stumbo is a writer, national speaker, pastor’s wife and ministry leader. She’s also the mother of a daughter with Down syndrome and an adopted daughter with cerebral palsy. 

While raising two children with special needs is a constant adventure, Ellen has found that some of the greatest challenges have come from the church.

“When my daughter was born with Down syndrome, one of my friends confessed she thought I deserved it. She said that I must have done something wrong for God to give me a child with a disability. Sadly, this is the message she had heard from her church, the same church I had attended growing up….

A Beautiful Home

Rachel Chimits
May 30, 2019

God brought one young woman out of a seemingly hopeless spiral and then blessed her with an incredible surprise.

Ashley was a cheerleader at her high school. Popular, pretty, she had ambitious dreams for a future in the medical field.

Life was buzzing right along between her family and friends, figuring out who was secretly crushing on whom, prepping for the next prom and keeping abreast of the most recent gossip about that hot new kid in her class.

She had her feet on the car’s dash, absently chatting to her friend and checking her phone when a car smashed into them.

A flare of light, a fan of shattered glass wrapped around the screech of bending metal.  

Finding the Ultimate Architect

Ilya Shchetinin
April 30, 2019

One World Challenge scholarship student shares how he went from a prospective architect to ministry leader.

I’m from Oregon City, outside Portland. Life was normal, going the usual route until this guy named Stan who was a Summit graduate married someone at my church. Whenever he was speaking, I noticed something different about him, so I finally approached him and said, “Hey, we should talk.”

Stan looked me in the eye for a solid 30 seconds, saying nothing, and I was thinking, What’s going on right now? I just said I wanted to talk.

Then he offered to hang out. We talked about life, and he eventually became my mentor. In a lot of ways, he encouraged me to think differently about God. 

Preparing for Easter

Rachel Chimits
April 16, 2019

Some of the great symbols of our faith have been sadly misused in history, but this doesn’t make them any less important.

My mother observed Lent and always wore all black to church on Good Friday. One time, shortly before we left the house, I asked her why. 

“Today is kind of like remembering Jesus’ funeral. Of course, we know he’s alive and waiting for us in heaven, but first he had to die.”

As a child who’d already attended several family funerals, the connection of the dark clothes and those memories made a stark impression on me of the early disciples’ emotions and seriousness of Jesus’ sacrifice.  

The Passover Controversy

Rachel Chimits
April 19, 2019

One of the biggest holidays surrounding Jesus’ sacrifice and resurrection is polarizing people.

Whether you’re settling in to watch Ten Commandments or Prince of Egypt with the family to kick off this pre-Easter weekend, the part of the story most likely to invoke questions among children or just generally inquisitive viewers is the angel of death and the Passover feast.

What is this ritual of covering the door lintels with blood and eating a very specific meal that one night? 

Passover as a Symbol

If you’re a Christian who has had the opportunity to join a Seder meal—the traditional night of celebration on Passover—or a messianic Jew, then you are no doubt well aware of the wealth of symbolism pointing toward Christ and his sacrifice.

Helping Hands for U.S. Students

Rachel Chimits
April 9, 2019

Local churches, nonprofits and businesses have joined forces with their school district to help underprivileged students with spectacular results.

A few years ago, the Federal Department of Education found that 94 percent of teachers pay for classroom materials or students’ supplies out of their own pocket.

On average, these teachers spent around $480 with some footing a bill as large as $1,000 for school necessities.

While many teachers are finding outside grants and other innovative ways to raise funds for their classrooms, it can still be deeply disheartening to run out of extra pens, pencils, and notebooks and then find a student on the first day of school whose third- or fourth-hand backpack is empty.

Building Lives and Lands on Truth

Adewunmi Adetayo
March 25, 2019

Social innovator and World Challenge scholarship student Adewunmi is dreaming of bringing communities a clearer vision of who God is.

As a child in Nigeria, I always saw poverty. Maybe 2% of the population is living with a ridiculous amount of money, and the other 98% are spinning their wheels and going in circles even though there is enough for everyone to have enough. 

It’s just a fact of living there, though it shouldn’t have to be.

The Fragile Church

I came to the US when I was 16, and I moved to New York City after college to work in the fashion industry.