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Building for Burundi’s Mothers

Rachel Chimits
April 23, 2019

A group of churches in Bujumbura are working to help widowed women achieve economic independence and a new life in Christ.

The Baptist Union of Churches was founded in 1928 and is the oldest evangelic and one of the most respected groups in Burundi. 

In 1972, during a surge of tribal conflict between the Hutu and Tutsi, churches’ pastors were either killed or fled the country. Despite the terrible devastation, the church has recovered. 

Today, there are 97 main churches and 147 satellite churches across the country with about 75,000 members. The fallout of Burundi’s civil war has led to a widespread struggle with poverty for many of the country’s people, so the church has set up programs to help many of the local widows. 

New Life in Uganda

Rachel Chimits
April 11, 2019

One village sent out someone to track down help for them, and today their lives are transformed.

In February, heat shimmers over the road. This is Uganda’s summer season, and temperatures soar to 95 degrees or higher at midday. This heralds the beginning of the Lira sub-region’s rainy season. 

Orumo’s residents are gathered under a mango tree as Steve Voyen, World Challenge’s director of Sub-Saharan development programs, and Dan, Uganda’s development director, pull up. 

An adult literacy lesson is taking place beneath the mango’s broad canopy that cuts the stifling heat. Students labor over a passage of scripture as Samuel, a local community trainer, teaches them to pronounce each word on the page. 

Lost in Cambodia’s Jungle

World Challenge Staff
April 8, 2019

One woman fought a tremendous but losing battle to provide for her family alone until she met the God who saves.

Sokun, her husband and their three young children lived a village near the border of Cambodia and Thailand. The family had little income but were still making ends meet; Sokun sold vegetables in the local market, and her husband worked as a logger. 

The family was rattled, however, when Sokun’s younger sister showed up on their doorstep with her three daughters, all under 5 years old. Her husband had divorced her, and she now had little means with which to care for the children. 

She abandoned her daughters with Sokun. 

The family’s food store and already meager income simply couldn’t keep up with six children, most of them toddlers.