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Gospel Fire in the Middle East

Rachel Chimits
June 14, 2019

From a fatherless street kid to father-figure for refugee children, one man tells about God's incredible work in his life and in Lebanon.

Muhammad’s father died when he was young, and he grew up more or less on Beirut’s streets. His mother sent him to a nearby church’s Sunday school in hopes that it would keep him out of trouble.

As he grew older, he had more and more questions for the Sunday school teachers who seemed like the only people in his world with the patience and kindness to listen.

He tried to be a good Muslim and study the Quran, but he was disturbed by what he found in it.

Protecting Mothers and the Unborn

Rachel Chimits
May 22, 2019

In the Philippines, church workers are helping educate pregnant women about how to keep themselves and their babies healthy.

Pregnancy usually means extra doctor visits to make sure the mother and baby stay healthy.

Some women, however, don’t have this option because either they live in a remote village or it’s not traditional practice. They often don’t realize the many health benefits that preventative care can offer both them and their child.

In the Philippines, World Challenge partners have begun offering “mothers’ classes” for pregnant women in rural or poorer areas. 

Helping Hands for U.S. Students

Rachel Chimits
April 9, 2019

Local churches, nonprofits and businesses have joined forces with their school district to help underprivileged students with spectacular results.

A few years ago, the Federal Department of Education found that 94 percent of teachers pay for classroom materials or students’ supplies out of their own pocket.

On average, these teachers spent around $480 with some footing a bill as large as $1,000 for school necessities.

While many teachers are finding outside grants and other innovative ways to raise funds for their classrooms, it can still be deeply disheartening to run out of extra pens, pencils, and notebooks and then find a student on the first day of school whose third- or fourth-hand backpack is empty.