Lithuania | World Challenge

Lithuania

Caring for the Homeless in Lithuania

Rachel Chimits
June 12, 2019

One woman is working hard to make sure that those often neglected by her hometown have somewhere safe to go. 

Lithuania’s capital, Vilnius, is the country’s largest city and famous for its historical architecture. Mark Buzzetta, Director of World Challenge’s Mercy Missions, wasn’t there to see castles and museums, though. Instead, he was looking for a food kitchen.

Larisa is the founder of Charity Kitchen and one of World Challenge’s partners. She has a huge heart for the neglected elderly and homeless in a city that often has little time for either.

1 Corinthians 1:18 has motivated her to carry on in the face of criticism for feeding the homeless: “The message of the cross is foolish to those who are headed for destruction! But we who are being saved know it is the very power of God.” 

An Orphan Turned Mother

Rachel Chimits
June 4, 2019

Many of Lithuania’s children have grown up without families, but one woman is working to give them a home.

Reda spent four years in a children’s home during the Soviet occupation of Lithuania. Later, as a young adult, she was moved to a dormitory with other children like herself. No one seemed to care about them, and they had to find jobs and otherwise prepare for the adult world alone.

“There was no help for kids in the homes,” she said, remembering that time. “Even then I wondered why.”

When she turned 24, Reda was saved, and she strongly felt the Lord said, “Reach out to these children.” God gave her a wonderful husband, and they began raising their own family, but God’s call on her life was always in the back of her mind.

A New Day for Lithuania

Rachel Chimits
December 11, 2018

Children are finding God in the wake of war and occupation.

Did you know that Lithuania has two independence days? This oddity hints at their tumultuous history clamped between the Baltic Sea and Russia. 

Nearly fifty years after being annexed by the USSR, this small ex-soviet country is still finding its feet in the wake of an oppressive occupation. Issues with unemployment, substance abuse and domestic violence are common in Luthuania’s badly depressed economy. 

Countless children from families in the low socioeconomic strata end up running around the streets unwatched for hours every day because their parents or guardians are at work or absent.